A Lesson on Hibiscus

“What is that big pink flower?”

I would be well on my way to becoming a very wealthy woman if I had a dollar for every time I answered that question posed by someone who stopped to admire the pink hibiscus in our front yard.

As a gardener, it is very gratifying watching people stop to admire our flowers, and even more so if they want to talk about them or ask a question. This time of year, admirers often want to know more about the giant pink flowers by my front porch. Gardener-types usually want to know what type of hibiscus it is. I know there are many types of hibiscus, but I really know very little about them. It was time to learn more about this amazing flower. Like any good student today, I went to Google and did an internet search. There are many amazing tutorials and articles from which to glean, but my favorite was this excellent post. Please click on the hyperlink if you are equally curious to learn more about a flower which delivers such beauty to the late summer garden.

Rose mallow Hibiscus ‘Tie Dye’

Happy gardening!

Author: barefootlilylady

I love sharing about my barefoot gardening adventures, hence my blogger name. As I write, some of my other passions might spill out -- like fun with grandkids, baking and sewing endeavors, what I'm studying in Scripture, and the like. My readers will notice that one of the primary things I write about is Alzheimer's. May what I write be an encouragement to anyone who is a caregiver for someone they love with memory loss.

4 thoughts on “A Lesson on Hibiscus”

  1. Such a beautiful flower, no wonder people stop by. I know what seems to be known as Chinese hibiscus. It’s very common here and is known just as Hibiscus or, strangely, shoe-flower. I love the way the red flowers pop amidst the glossy green leaves.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jaya, thanks for taking the time to comment. Your comment prompted me to do a little more reading about shoe-flower. I haven’t figured out how they do it yet, but it is apparently also known in certain parts of India and China as ‘shoeblackplant’ and used to shine shoes. It’s also used in making black hair dye. Who knew? So interesting!
      Blessings,
      Cindie

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, now I remember my grandmother used to heat the flowers in coconut oil till they turned black. The oil would be cooled and strained, and bottled for use. But it was such a task that as we grew older, we stopped doing it.
        I have heard of people rubbing flowers on black leather shoes for a quick shine but haven’t tried it.
        Love your posts!

        Like

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