Five Helpful Purchases for the Alzheimer’s Caregiver

I’m on the other side of caregiving now and am looking back on that experience and wanting to share a few of the most helpful purchases my husband and I made to assist us as we provided care for my mother.

  1. Mattress Protection and plenty of bedding – nearly every person who struggles with memory loss will come to the point where incontinence is a fact of life. One of the best purchases I made was this mattress cover. We had a hospital bed, so purchased a Twin XL. This particular cover actually was waterproof and saved our mattress from certain ruin over and over again. It completely covered the mattress — trust me, this is important. I only needed to wipe it down with a disinfectant spray, but it also washed up nicely in the washing machine on warm. I would give it a tumble drying on air-dry with several dry towels romping around in the dryer with it. We had purchased a second-hand hospital bed and it fit that mattress very well. One of the nicest things about this cover was that it was quiet–no plastic crinkling sounds when moving the bed position, or just tossing and turning a bit at night.
The very best mattress cover we tried. It’s worth your money to purchase two so that you have an extra for those nights when the accident is …ummm…really messy.

2. An Alzheimer’s friendly clock. There are many clocks available for purchase, but I can only begin to tell you how helpful this clock was – especially in the early and middle stages of dementia. We bought two. One for mom’s bedroom and one to keep in the kitchen near her spot at the table. There comes a time in the Alzheimer’s journey where the ability to measure time is lost. You can read my post highlighting the benefits of this clock in my previous post, “When Time Stands Still,” which you can find here. To be honest, now that we’re retired and not marking time with daily routines, hubby and I reference this clock ourselves when we’re having a “what day is it anyway?” moment of our own.

3. These waterproof pads. Yes, disposable ones are nice, especially when your loved one is sick and having bouts of diarrhea. However, these are wonderful for everyday use. I recommend you purchase the largest size so as to cover as much of the bed as possible. More often than not, whatever accident happens will be caught on this pad, which will save you changing all of the sheets and blankets in the wee hours of the morning. These pads will also come in quite handy if your loved one likes to sit in a recliner or other upholstered chair.

Don’t worry…they come in colors other than pink

4. A wireless security camera. I know there are a lot of camera options out there these days. This D-Link camera did a great job of helping us see mom when she would get up at night – its night vision and ability to pan and tilt remotely was so helpful. This camera helped me in the earlier stages when she was living on her own and I just wanted to check-in and make sure she was okay. In later stages when she needed to live with us, it picked up on her motions at night alerting me to any needs she might have for my help or intervention.

D-Link Indoor Full HD WiFi Security Camera, 2 Way Audio, Pan Tilt Zoom 1080P, Motion Detection, Night Vision, MicroSD & Cloud Recording, Works with Alexa and Google Assistant (DCS-8525LH-US)

5. And just for fun, we bought this colored pencil set and plenty of adult coloring books. My mom just loved them when she was in the middle stages and earlier part of late-stage dementia. Not only did she enjoy coloring, but she also enjoyed sorting the pencils into color groupings. The zippered case was nice too…it was amazing what all she could squirrel away in there along with her pencils.

Interesting thing to note: as the disease progressed, Momma gravitated toward using only green and yellow in her coloring. This meant that over time we bought various colored pencils sets to replace the greens and yellows and now have LOTS of colored pencils in every color but green or yellow.

Disappearing Friendships

I caught a glimpse of an old friend at the gym today. I don’t think she saw me pedaling away on an exercise bike while she attended a nearby group exercise class. My face immediately smiled when I saw her, then my heart sank with sadness just as quickly. You see, my friend had walked out on our friendship a few years ago. I never understood why.

I still don’t.

I’m usually pretty timid and non-confrontational – but, as I pedaled, I imagined myself boldly giving my old friend the “what-for.” How could she just leave? Never look back? Never say good-bye? Never again tell me that she loved me and cherished our friendship?

Of course, I didn’t really say it.

Today’s ‘disappearing friend’ experience made me wonder about the friends and family who ‘disappear’ from my mom’s life in her world living with the debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s. As her memories fade, recollection of friendships forged over many years vanish too. Some of her dear family and friends still send cards. She loves to receive them in the mail (and will read them over and over again, each time as if it is the first), but she really can’t remember the person who sent the card. Sometimes a tiny glimmer of recognition glistens in her eyes if I pull out old pictures, or show her that friend’s photos on Facebook, or retell a story she once told me about this friend.

Not a care in the world when you’re coloring!

Alzheimer’s is cruel. But, I’m thinking it may also be a form of grace in old age. You see, my encounter today with my own disappearing friendship brought up lingering feelings of deep hurt and resentment, highlighting my own need to exercise forgiveness in relationships. With Alzheimer’s, my momma’s hurt feelings last only for a moment. Then she picks up a coloring book and her colored pencils and the hurt just vanishes.

A New Box of Crayons

When I married my husband, my last name became Winquist. As I have melded into that name over the years, I have learned that there are certain things that go along with that name. New culinary tastes are part of the territory. I’ve learned, for instance, that homemade pies are very important. Especially rhubarb pie. Mashed potatoes are definitely made from scratch…and gravy too (still haven’t caught on to that part).

As a newbie Winquist, I learned frugality was a high priority. Empty jars and worn-out t-shirts get a second life, leftover ketchup packets are saved for future home use, and fruit and veggie scraps become wonderful compost for the gardens. My dear mother-in-law was the ‘Queen of Repurposing’ long before repurposing was even a thing. Bread bags and plastic butter tubs were rarely thrown away. Boxes took on a new life when they were covered with contact paper to make classier looking storage containers.  She even made her own rubber bands from her old support stockings (some of which are still in use in this house today).

Yes, frugality is a way of life for us.

When my daughter was in first grade, her teacher shared a concern with us at parent-teacher conference. Apparently, our family’s frugality was getting in the way of Beth enjoying first grade to its fullest. The Winquist-by-birth in our family had vetoed the Winquist-by-marriage during the requisite annual school supply shopping expedition by deciding that our daughter’s gently used crayons from kindergarten still had enough life in them for first grade. But, apparently, our Beth couldn’t help but notice that ALL of the other kids in the class had brand new crayons. It apparently sucked the joy right out of coloring for her.

At Mrs. Warner’s suggestion, Wayne lovingly laid aside his frugality and bought our Beth a new box of crayons. You would have thought he bought her the rarest treasure on earth. By laying aside the frugality and the putting on of generosity, the joy of coloring was back! In fact, since we had delayed our purchase, she now proudly owned the newest crayons in the class!

Momma happily engaged in coloring
This memory from our daughter’s childhood came to mind the other day when my still frugal husband exercised loving generosity by purchasing a fancy-schmancy set of Thornton’s colored pencils for my mother – complete with a carrying case. It was neat to witness the same joy in Mom’s eyes that I had seen in my daughter’s eyes years before. Momma’s world, lived in the throes of Alzheimer’s, was suddenly brighter and filled with more color and joy.